A "HealthTweep" Pulse Check

Exploring transformational potential of social media

Posts Tagged ‘health systems

HealthCamp San Diego 2011

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Hot of the press! HealthCamp San Diego will be held in conjunction with the Health 2.0 Spring Fling on March 20th, 2011. Sponsored by Kaiser Permanente and the Rady School of Management.

For details, click here.

 

MIA? Not Really…

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There is much happening in the whirlwind of health reform, and the granular transformation enabled by the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). The theater in Washington notwithstanding and well as the growing storm of legal challenges to the insurance mandate leave much of the implementation path somewhat clouded.

Yet the ‘roll up your sleeves and make a difference’ crowd rather than whine and obstruct, are rather busy and focused on the granular transformational opportunites written into PPACA.

You will find some of the more interesting posts and updates from the proactive players at ACO Watch, and well as it’s sister podcast via ACO Watch: A Mid-Week Revew.

Three recent posts are well worth singling out, they include:

Jaan Didorov, MD, and publisher of the Disease Management Blog, on ‘No Faux ACO’s Here!’ A play witty on CMS Administrator Don Berwick’s earlier industry admonition, as well as ‘How To Get Independent Physicians Into an Accountable Care Organization‘, offers select insights and commentary of a mature IDN, absent the staff (or employed group)  model DNA typically associated with Mayo, and Kaiser Permanente ACO strains, but more of a private/voluntary medical staff model culture, over at Advocate Health Partners.

Also, check out ACOs and the Shared Savings Program; Some Common Misconceptions, by Reed Tinsley, CPA.

We welcome your comments and engagement!

Launch of ‘ACO Watch’

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Welcome to ‘ACO Watch‘. With the first official ACO to be so anointed shortly by the regulatory apparatus in Washington, DC and/or Baltimore, we thought there might be a place to monitor, track, educate, inform and perhaps even entertain as we witness the ramp-up for the ACO indusry – staggered as it may be.

Opening post is pasted below:

Welcome to ‘ACO Watch’ – keeping a pulse on the race!

October 5th, 2010 § 1 Comment

With the March passage of the ‘Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), the ‘follow the money’ floodgates are once again opening for hospitals, physicians, integrated delivery systems, health plans, and consultants. This time, instead of migrating ‘HMO lite’ (neither staff nor group model) platforms into mainstream medicine via IPAs, we’re now talking about their ‘new and improved’ successors broadly cast as ‘Accountable Care Organizations aka ‘ACOs’.

Some call it ‘managed care 2.0′, while the more cynical among us envision it as the full employment act for consultants, and health care lawyers, shopping a not ready for prime time, if not fundamentally flawed ‘business model’.

Given the high level of interest in these ostensible quality promoting, while cost restraining entities, the staggered implementation timeline in general, the ACO January 1, 2012 fuse in particular, and the broad brush framework intentionally reflected in PPACA, we thought it a good idea to keep a pulse on the ramp up to the highly anticipated ‘go live’ date.

We welcome your interest and contributions to this conversation.

Please check out ACO Watch or updates, guest posts, news, conferences and webinars that may be useful to you!

Written by 2healthguru

October 8, 2010 at 4:31 PM

The ‘Medical Aggregators': Are We Entering Round Deux?

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First a little historical context:

For those with a healthcare ‘event horizon’ slightly more seasoned than the current health reform and related social media data frames, you might remember the initial round of aggregation in medicine lead by disruptive nameplates such as MedPartners (now operating the PBM CareMark), PhyCor, FPA Medical Management, and their second or third tier physician practice management ‘me too’ copycats.

They all emerged from a robust round of venture capital backed industry determination tagged as ‘PPMC’s’, i.e., physician practice management companies. These ‘aggregators’ were the darlings of Wall Street for a while, though with some exceptions, i.e., US Oncology (formerly Physician Reliance Network), most witnessed relatively short life spans, from IPO to unwinding in perhaps a 10 year run (see: MedPartners collapse and Aftermath).

Yet, despite the promise outlined in the offering prospectus’, why did these entities fail so miserably as the ‘white knight’ consolidators or aggregators of a multi-trillion dollar ‘cottage medical industry’? Their business model proferred essentially three core benefits:

  1. Centralized, standardized and more efficient back office medical administrative management
  2. Scale of market asset concentration and therefore increased sophistication and leverage (improved pricing) with third party payor negotiation, and downstream contract management; and
  3. Serve as an ‘anchor play’ with respect to the broader design and implementation of rational though market based local delivery organization and financing, i.e., PPMC’s would harness and more effectively articulate a business culture among physicians that valued clinical integration, medical risk management, and ultimately the allocation of limited health care resources

At least this was the longer term expectation from a ‘win/win’, i.e., payor and provider perspective, of the more established players. Most however, in an effort to demonstrate value (i.e., earn their management fee) to their physician boards, focused on short term margin improvement (better rates, focus on more profitable services via improved payor mix, maximizing the contract revenue/recovery cycle, and reduced overhead, etc.), vs. the strategic focus of managing the risk (both quality and cost) of their local population (i.e., enrolled members).

So rather quickly the strategic basis of the PPMC appeal was subordinated to a short term focus (i.e., increasing net revenues) due to a rising chorus of claims that at its core the business model was merely a third party ponzi scheme which introduced another mouth to feed from an increasingly constrained health care supply chain.

Net/net, the PPMC industry flamed out big time and did not fulfill its ‘roll-up’ promise of the practice of medicine. Now many years later, we are at another tipping point. Witness the current round of promising vehicles with a similar vision of organizing physicians. These candidates include: hospital systems, health plans, integrated delivery systems, emerging ACOs, medical homes,  and even niche play organizers in the concierge, or direct practice space including SignatureMD, MDVIP, HealthAccess Rhode Island, CarePractice, Qliance, and HelloHealth, as well as the rapidly emerging series of retail pharmacy sponsored primary care clinics, e.g., CVS/CareMark Minute Clinic, etc.

Too many docs are unwilling to risk the capital of private practice, and instead are looking to hook-up with one or more of these institutional or VC backed entrepreneurial sponsors. Will they succeed where their predecessors failed? If so, why?

From my perspective, it will clearly depend on the business model chosen to enable competition of the right variety, and the degree to which the venture embraces, nurtures and expresses physician culture that values collaborative group practice. Top down, corporate strategies dependent upon an over worked and out gunned medical director or VP of medical affairs will miss the mark. The more likely way for these ventures to succeed is by ‘baking’ the culture from the ground up. In other words, ‘seed it and they will come’. One of my mentors (Ernest Holmes) once wrote long ago: ‘the soil can’t argue with the seed’. Lets nourish the soil first, then make sure we plant the seeds with the right constitution and vision.

Health Reform Summit: More Theater of the Absurd or Gettin’ it Done?

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So where’s the ‘smart money’ on the likely net take away from the health reform summit, or as the more cynical would say ‘Obama health care photo-op’?

I suppose the prevailing sentiment would say hey it’s Washington, and therefore more theater with sound byte positioning for ‘ideologue base speak’ is the best we can expect. But might there be another way to frame this event, and its potential to yield one or more tangible deliverables for the health reform imperative?

As has been chronicled elsewhere, while Americans remain divided on key provisions of Senate and House approved bills, certain provisions are quite popular among majorities of Democrats, Independents and Republicans. When coupled with a national mood that is pretty fed up with finger pointing, and the relentless blame game, seasoned with recent revelations of obscene Anthem or Blue Cross individual health insurance premium rate increase requests in Michigan (56%) and California (39%), it just may be possible to hold these politicians accountable to the American people.

Lets face it, while its been a long and painful process to observe (especially the Senate Finance committee) or engage in, clearly the subject of the American health care delivery system, and its failing financing paradigm is a top of mind issue even for Joe Six-pack and those who might otherwise not give the subject the time of day.

So the time is now, ‘the whole world is watching’, and yes, failure is NOT an option. A bill must be signed that fully embraces the initial ‘Obama-care 101: The president’s 8 principles‘ or the more recently published  ‘Presidents Proposal for Health Reform‘.

For those of you who will not consume the health reform summit live, here is Ezra Klein’s ‘A Viewer’s Guide to Health Care Summit‘ courtesy of the Washington Post.

So Tweeps, lets get ‘er done!

Written by 2healthguru

February 24, 2010 at 11:05 PM

Health Care Web Literacy with HealthTweep & Thought Leader @PhilBaumann

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On Tuesday’s broadcast at 9 AM Pacific and 12 Noon Eastern, I will chat with Phil Baumann on our nascent yet rapidly emerging new media, aka ‘social’ industry. We will talk about a range of issues from web literacy to content building, promotion, branding and attempts at monetization.

For more information on Phil see his blog here; and Twitter page here. Phil is a witty, generous producer and insightful publisher of social media pieces; a sampling of which can be seen via:  140 Health Care Uses For Twitter, The World’s First Twitter Chat for Nurses: RNchat, and Google Is Watching You: Building Your Reputation on Google.

We invite your participation in the program via call in, chat or Tweetstream’s of @PhilBaumann or @2healthguru; the call in phone number is 347.539.5527.

Written by 2healthguru

January 18, 2010 at 3:13 PM

Ed Bennett on Trends in Social Media for Hospitals & Health Care Organizations

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Please join me for a conversation with Ed Bennett!

On the Wednesday, January 13th ‘Trends in Social Media for Hospitals and Health Care Organizations‘ broadcast I am pumped to chat with Ed Bennett of ‘Found In Cache: Social Media resources for health care professionals’ as well as his day job at the University of Maryland Medical System.

I affectionately refer to Ed (rumored to be a die hard Cowboy Junkies aficionado) as the Social Media for Hospitals ‘Oracle’ from Maryland. Ed is a leading voice, documentarian, and visionary change agent in the social media for health care organizations’ space. His tireless commitment to track, update, educate, share and vet emerging health care organizational participation in social media is a major contribution to the granular evolution of the space. Please join me in this conversation with Ed! You can call in with questions or active participation via 347.539.5527, or participate in the chat room;  or as many do, just lurk. All are welcome!

The program airs at 12 noon Eastern time, 9AM. If you can not make it live, it will archive here for rebroadcast or download. I like to subscribe to episodes and listen at my convenience via Google Reader. iTunes of other RSS feed burner.

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