A "HealthTweep" Pulse Check

Exploring transformational potential of social media

Posts Tagged ‘twitter

HealthCamp San Diego 2011

leave a comment »

 

Hot of the press! HealthCamp San Diego will be held in conjunction with the Health 2.0 Spring Fling on March 20th, 2011. Sponsored by Kaiser Permanente and the Rady School of Management.

For details, click here.

 

Advertisements

Who Should Manage Your Social Media Strategy [Accepted for publication in The Physician Executive]

leave a comment »

By Kent Bottles, M.D., aka @kentbottles and Tom Sherlock aka @coloradohealth

Hospital and medical group leaders are facing the most challenging healthcare environment in recent memory. The need to decrease per-capita cost and increase quality to respond to federal healthcare reform and the global economy is a daunting task that requires two-way communication with a broad range of stakeholders. As reform unfolds, hospitals and medical groups of all sizes are embracing social media tools as soon as they realize that they’re no longer optional.

At least since the first quarter of 2010, analysts have been reporting that websites and search engines no longer dominate online communication.[i] Deloitte’s Social Networks in Health Care [ii] recently concluded that healthcare executives:

“who do not consider how to incorporate social networks into their future strategies risk being run over on the super-highway of health information sharing.”

Your social media strategy will work more smoothly when no one department has control, because it’s likely that before long employees in many of your departments will be using social media to do their jobs. It’s time for your Internet strategy to be managed by a qualified person — definitely one of your best-and-brightest — who reports directly to senior management and works with all department heads as an equal colleague.[iii]

You no longer have the opportunity to be an early adopter, but you can give yourself a big advantage by having people in every department who’ve been trained how to use social media intelligently, and who follow the lead of your social media manager. It’s essential that you understand that each of these tools is designed to nurture personal relationships and thereby strengthen loyalty to your institution:

  • We use Twitter as our principal example because it’s a more important business tool for hospitals and medical groups than Facebook.
  • If your organization isn’t already on Facebook, you should wait until you have a specific strategic reason for using it.
  • Blogs can be particularly effective business tools if they let readers get to know and understand the blogger. Paul Levy’s “Running a Hospital” blog[iv] has shown how a CEO blog can be a powerful communication and branding tool.
  • Many of your people should be listed on LinkedIn. Each person’s profile will be unique, but a certain amount of coordination is necessary to make sure your institution is identified accurately and consistently, for example.
  • Your YouTube channel can present videos that let people get to know some of your key physicians and nurses, for example. Your social media manager can see to it that the content, style, and production values of your videos will send the right message about your organization.

You might conclude that you need to hire someone new to manage your website and your social media strategy. But don’t rush into a decision to bring in someone new to be your social media manager just because they have experience with these tools. It would be far better to find someone who is already thoroughly familiar with and personally committed to your institution.[v]

Note right away that social media is not something you use for advertising or marketing, and that it doesn’t duplicate or replace any of the functions of your website. When you reduce it to its fundamentals, social media strategy isn’t complicated. It’s social. It’s about establishing and nurturing authentic relationships in ways that will build loyalty to your institution. Your social media manager will:
Listen to what’s being said about you anywhere on the Internet, with special attention to your own social media channels.Respond by engaging those who are talking to or about your organization.Establish relationships by showing people respect, honesty, and enthusiasm, and then nurture those relationships by authentic personal interaction. Your social media manager will…..   (Read complete blog post, here).

To listen to Kent’s sage yet witty podcast, ‘Muddling Through The Week In Healthcare’, click here or on the BlogTalkRadio image.

Kent Bottles, M.D., is a former medical school professor, president and ceo, chief medical officer, and chief knowledge officer who is now an independent health care consultant, keynote speaker, and writer. kentbottles@gmail.com and http://twitter.com/KentBottles

Tom Sherlock is an Internet strategist, Website producer, and content developer who has worked with businesses and healthcare professionals since 1994. tom@aicolorado.com and http://twitter.com/ColoradoHealth

A Strategic Medical Group Algorithm To Assess ‘Social Media Readiness’

leave a comment »

So what is social media really all about in terms of its relevance and application to medical groups, whether single or multi-specialty? Is it really about a better way to push an often boring, ‘look what I/we can do’ PR messaging? Or is it a genuine offer of a transformational opportunity to re-engineer health care operations and practices in service of quality, access, cost transparency and patient engagement? I say one way to get closer to an answer is to walk through this initial set of questioning recently developed for a client.

ACO Medical Group (ACOMG) Strategic Questions

Is there a perceived need among the partners for a formal planned marketing and communications function at the Group level? Yes/No?

If no, end of conversation and on to the ‘next prospect’.

If yes,

Is the web viewed as a material source (actual or potential) for patient acquisition, business development, and connectivity with key ACOMG constituents? Yes/no?

If no, end.

If yes, should ACOMG invest in a coordinated and comprehensive ‘web presence’ that builds, positions and maintains real-time, interactive capabilities via a coordinated yet distributed set of both ‘push’ and digital interactive properties.

If no, end.

If yes, is ACOMG presently enabled to perform as a content development, publishing and management company that feeds and curates these content, keyword, market and niche rich community management properties?

If yes, end.

If no, are these core skill sets presently domiciled at ACOMG staff (whether via professional or administrative staff, consultants, etc.)?

If yes, end.

If no, how will ACOMG acquire, develop or otherwise embed the needed skill sets and core competencies?

Build, buy or do nothing?

If build, or buy is there a budget benchmarked to a formal marketing and communications program consistent with published management company guidelines as a percent of revenue or expenses? If yes, game on. If no, end of conversation or need for additional education (good luck!).

And while you consider this ‘social media readiness assessment’ do bear in mind that the world continues to spin and has minimally surfaced the following things to consider:

Additional strategic considerations to throw into the mix as market conditions and environmental context:

On the future of community medicine in general, or your version of community medicine via your specific specialty:

1. What alliances and/or networking arrangements should your group be considering?

2. What vehicles (legal entities or other forms of organizations) should your group be considering, e.g., single specialty IPA, or ‘super IPA’ (re-purposed specialty GPO), MSO, super MSO, associating with a 3rd party PPMC (i.e., US Oncology), linking with an hospital system (which one, might there be more, or even a multi-hospital vehicle to be created?)

3. What formal strategic positioning thought is underway given the relatively short horizon for ACO participation? Have you evaluated the range and wisdom of various participation options, i.e., as single sites; as an integrated group; with hospital participation or not ( a very key question)?

Basically [medical group leadership], do you have previous experience in dealing with these strategic issues (many of which seem to be re-cycling prior themes albeit with ‘new and improved’ acronyms)? Is there ‘institutional memory’ from the HMO, IPA, MSO, or PHO days? Is the ‘wisdom’ of the senior members of the group being shared with the younger generation, who carry the longitudinal stake in the practice’s sustainability? Or is the default position just to do nothing and see what happens?

Bottom line is it’s all about choice… and there is no ‘good’ or ‘bad’ here, only informed/uninformed choices and consequences; and inaction, denial or minimization is a firm choice, no doubt with inevitable consequences! Cheers!

HealthCamp San Diego Line-up Growing!

with 4 comments

With San Diego County’s emergence as a global center of health care innovation and its recent recognition by the state as an official California Innovation Hub focusing on wireless health, you should consider coming out to San Diego a day before the mHealth Networking Conference to participate in grass-roots health care innovation at the HealthCamp “unconference”.

HealthCamp San Diego is Tuesday, September 7 at the Town and Country Resort and Convention Center. Event sponsors are Kaiser Permanente San Diego, West Wireless Health Institute, Health 2.0, Pacific Oncology and several others.

The “unconference” begins with peers in health care and technology introducing topics and discussing innovations that will advance consumer-centric health care in the health 2.0 world.

Inspirational session leaders and participants include: Joe Smith, MD, Chief Medical and Science Officer of the West Wireless Health Institute; Vince Kuraitis of e-CareManagement; John Mattison, MD, Chief Medical Information Officer and Assistant Medical Director of Kaiser Permanente Southern California; Ted Chan, MD, Professor of Clinical Medicine, Medical Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, UC San Diego Medical Center, and leader of the San Diego Beacon Community initiative; Jeffrey Benabio, MD, (aka @DermDoc) a Kaiser Permanente dermatologist and leader in social media and patient care, and Michael Yada of Life Technologies.


Representatives will also be available to discuss the successful data exchange program in San Diego between Kaiser Permanente and the VA through the National Health Information Network (NHIN).

If this September 7th “unconference” event is of interest, please scroll down for more information.  We have only a handful of free spaces for journalists and bloggers, so if you are interested in attending, please let me know soon.

Join us! For more information or to register, click here.

The ‘Medical Aggregators’: Are We Entering Round Deux?

with 8 comments

First a little historical context:

For those with a healthcare ‘event horizon’ slightly more seasoned than the current health reform and related social media data frames, you might remember the initial round of aggregation in medicine lead by disruptive nameplates such as MedPartners (now operating the PBM CareMark), PhyCor, FPA Medical Management, and their second or third tier physician practice management ‘me too’ copycats.

They all emerged from a robust round of venture capital backed industry determination tagged as ‘PPMC’s’, i.e., physician practice management companies. These ‘aggregators’ were the darlings of Wall Street for a while, though with some exceptions, i.e., US Oncology (formerly Physician Reliance Network), most witnessed relatively short life spans, from IPO to unwinding in perhaps a 10 year run (see: MedPartners collapse and Aftermath).

Yet, despite the promise outlined in the offering prospectus’, why did these entities fail so miserably as the ‘white knight’ consolidators or aggregators of a multi-trillion dollar ‘cottage medical industry’? Their business model proferred essentially three core benefits:

  1. Centralized, standardized and more efficient back office medical administrative management
  2. Scale of market asset concentration and therefore increased sophistication and leverage (improved pricing) with third party payor negotiation, and downstream contract management; and
  3. Serve as an ‘anchor play’ with respect to the broader design and implementation of rational though market based local delivery organization and financing, i.e., PPMC’s would harness and more effectively articulate a business culture among physicians that valued clinical integration, medical risk management, and ultimately the allocation of limited health care resources

At least this was the longer term expectation from a ‘win/win’, i.e., payor and provider perspective, of the more established players. Most however, in an effort to demonstrate value (i.e., earn their management fee) to their physician boards, focused on short term margin improvement (better rates, focus on more profitable services via improved payor mix, maximizing the contract revenue/recovery cycle, and reduced overhead, etc.), vs. the strategic focus of managing the risk (both quality and cost) of their local population (i.e., enrolled members).

So rather quickly the strategic basis of the PPMC appeal was subordinated to a short term focus (i.e., increasing net revenues) due to a rising chorus of claims that at its core the business model was merely a third party ponzi scheme which introduced another mouth to feed from an increasingly constrained health care supply chain.

Net/net, the PPMC industry flamed out big time and did not fulfill its ‘roll-up’ promise of the practice of medicine. Now many years later, we are at another tipping point. Witness the current round of promising vehicles with a similar vision of organizing physicians. These candidates include: hospital systems, health plans, integrated delivery systems, emerging ACOs, medical homes,  and even niche play organizers in the concierge, or direct practice space including SignatureMD, MDVIP, HealthAccess Rhode Island, CarePractice, Qliance, and HelloHealth, as well as the rapidly emerging series of retail pharmacy sponsored primary care clinics, e.g., CVS/CareMark Minute Clinic, etc.

Too many docs are unwilling to risk the capital of private practice, and instead are looking to hook-up with one or more of these institutional or VC backed entrepreneurial sponsors. Will they succeed where their predecessors failed? If so, why?

From my perspective, it will clearly depend on the business model chosen to enable competition of the right variety, and the degree to which the venture embraces, nurtures and expresses physician culture that values collaborative group practice. Top down, corporate strategies dependent upon an over worked and out gunned medical director or VP of medical affairs will miss the mark. The more likely way for these ventures to succeed is by ‘baking’ the culture from the ground up. In other words, ‘seed it and they will come’. One of my mentors (Ernest Holmes) once wrote long ago: ‘the soil can’t argue with the seed’. Lets nourish the soil first, then make sure we plant the seeds with the right constitution and vision.

‘Health Geek Radio’ is on the web!

with 3 comments

Ok, this is definitely a report from the ‘lean and agile’ department, and a granular sign of the ‘interactive digital’ times we’re in.

This idea is about ten (10) days old. The genesis came from Susannah Fox, e-patient and Associate Director of Digital Strategy, of the Pew Internet and American Life Project. Susannah apparently caught my broadcast of Adam Bosworth who was keynoting at the Alliance for Healthcare Foundation’s Innovation Initiative in San Diego. While acknowledging the visuals weren’t best in class, she noted the content Adam offered was worth a listen and bucketed the event in the ‘health geek radio‘ domain.

When I first heard the name ‘health geek radio’ I thought, how cool is that? And certainly there’s a lot of interest in emerging technologies all dialed into the patient or consumer empowerment cause. So, I queried the domain and also checked to see if that account ID was available at BlogTalkRadio; to my surprise, both were open, so I promptly grabbed them.

Today, I recorded a brief introduction as to the genesis and forward value of creating such a health geek community focus. Take a listen here.

The first official broadcast is yet to be confirmed, but I will invite thought leaders and change agents into the conversation. Several who I have spoken with already have indicated an interest in participating, including: Matthew Holt, Dave DeBronkart (e-patientDave), Phil Baumann, and Dr. Danny Sands, to name a few.

Written by 2healthguru

May 14, 2010 at 3:12 PM

Accountable Care Organizations (aka ‘ACOs’): Ellwood’s SuperMed Vision Lives!

with one comment

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is now law, and the ‘devil is in the details’ scramble is on both inside and outside the beltway. The great divide seems to (disproportionately) line-up between the let’s roll up our sleeves and get ‘er done crowd, and the perhaps politically motivated ‘denial-ists’ hoping to successfully challenge the constitutionality of the law.

Via a separate post, I will address the ‘managed care 2.0’ nature of what we’ll likely witness as one who’s been on the ground, and frontline of change since the early 80s when the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) sported a placard for a little known office titled the office of ‘alternative delivery systems’, the then tiny shop in Baltimore that monitored the growth of HMOs and it’s California derivative, and soon to be dubbed ‘preferred provider organizations (PPOs). What followed is quite a storied path….

Meanwhile, let me call your attention to a timely piece of work offered by Paul Keckley and the health policy braintrust at Deloitte, titled: ‘Accountable Care Organizations: A new model for sustainable innovation‘. The title abstract is reprinted below, or you may download the full report via the site link above.

To understand how accountable care organizations (ACOs) might drive payment reform in the public and private health care sectors, this paper reviews the basic origins, definition and drivers of ACOs, and describes key features of proposed ACO initiatives, including the federal government’s proposed pilot program. In addition, using an assessment of ACO literature and Deloitte analysis, the paper profiles four structural approaches that are eligible for ACO status and puts forth seven key capabilities that are important considerations for ACO performance. Finally, this paper offers Deloitte’s perspective on the path forward and describes potential innovations that could increase ACO adoption.

So will it be ‘deja vu’ all over again, or will it be different this time? Put another way, those who wish to deny the past, may somehow find a way to re-create it. Oh, the tangled web we sometimes weave…..more will be revealed!

Written by 2healthguru

April 21, 2010 at 1:58 PM